When you say Speake-Marin, you're talking about an iconic brilliance that will never fade in the watchmaking history. The London Chronograph tells such story. This version pays a tribute to none other than Peter Speake-Marin, and his first challenges as a watchmaker when he sought to restore antique watches in the Piccadilly arcade in London. Peter, who was initially qualified as a horologist at the London's Hackney College, was bent to further his education. He went to Switzerland to undergo a training under the Watchmakers of Switzerland Training and Education Program in the lively district of Neuchâtel. His first three commercial watchmaking positions were cut short, all because he was passionate enough to grow not as a professional horologist, but an artisan watchmaker in the heart and soul.

It was in 1990 when he met Georges Somlo, where he stayed and restored various kinds of wrist and pocket watches for 6 years. Here, he discovered the satisfaction of repairing vintage Valjoux chronograph movements, which he dearly loved. This love reflects the memory of his six-year stay in London and is now translated in a watch.

The movements used for the London Chronograph was bought by an enthused curator of vintage movement and hid it away for many years. It had waited for such a time it will be called—here, now, in the Speake-Marin London Chronograph. This movement, the Valjoux 92, was a popular movement used in the 1950s, succeeding the famous Valjoux 23. This caliber was similarly sized at 29.5mm but utilized different technology—an oscillating pinion design with two chronograph engagements at the back. Valjoux movements, it must be said, are composed of column will designs. But Valjoux 92 has seven pillars whose movement will be visible at London Chronograph's sapphire case back.

While the components inside were entirely historic, the facade is far from the conventional. The 42mm case is wrought out of titanium, polished and coated with black DLC. The Piccadilly case, giving a nod Peter's early years in his work, comes with a unique style that engages both modern and classical lovers. The design aesthetics is bold and elegant, where the entire dial is of white canvass whit a black central part that presents a sporty look, especially when paired with the black rubber strap.

The dial itself is noteworthy to behold; it is almost three dimensional visually. There is an aperture for the 30-minute recorder and the seconds dial. The hour numerals speak Gothic, legibly written in large fonts and visible markers. The Speake-Marin signature style also presents the red and blued hands.

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